KEY POINTS

  • Kenneth Copeland's net worth is around $300 million
  • He is a known televangelist, author, musician and pastor
  • Copeland owns three private jets

Kenneth Copeland’s net worth is $300 million. But how did he amass such massive wealth?

Copeland ranked number one on the list of richest pastors. Included in the list are Christian Broadcasting Network’s Pat Robertson, This Is Your Day’s Benny Hinn, Lakewood Church’s Joel Osteen, American Word of Faith’s Creflo Dollar and Southern Baptist minister Billy Graham, among others.

Copeland is not shy to admit he has the means and one of the things he splurges on are private jets. He acquired the Gulfstream V, formerly owned by Tyler Perry, for $20 million. He also allegedly owns three of them. Flying in a private jet is something Copeland believes he must do, claiming before that flying commercially exposes him to a “bunch of demons in a tube.” 

Aside from church offerings, the minister is getting funds from selling books, preaching on TV and selling DVDs. More than the jets, Copeland lives a lavish lifestyle. He lives in a $6.3 lakefront mansion and the Kenneth Copeland Ministries can be found in a property which features a church and private airstrip and hangar.

The lifestyle of the most popular ministers is often scrutinized, but they claim they are converting thousands of people closer to God and they believe nothing is wrong with living a life of excess. Referencing the bible where others have lived extravagantly such as Abraham, Copeland believes it is not hard for the wealthy to enter the heavens, which contradicts what the bible says. “All things are possible with God,” he explained.

The known televangelist made headlines recently after proclaiming that America is healed from COVID-19. The pandemic is currently wreaking havoc worldwide, effectively paralyzing the economy and burdening the already stretched healtcare services of the priviliged nations and third world countries. 

The American author and native of Texas is also a musician. Celebrity Net Worth reports that he had a hit called "Pledge of Love" before he focused on Christianity in 1962. 

According to Extra, Copeland claims the source of the problem is not the consumption of wildlife but Satan himself. His speech borders on absurdity but not lacking in confidence. The minister assures everyone that he already demanded a solution to come immediately in the form of vaccines.   

With the world in shambles, people in fear will cling to what they believe can save them from the virus. The multimillionare televangelists have the reach and platform to spread their own take on the issue.