The Biden administration has released its plan to roll out the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID vaccine for younger children as soon as it is authorized by U.S. drug regulators.

The plan from the White House looks to vaccinate 28 million children aged 5 to 11 using a smaller dose. The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID vaccine is approved for use in individuals aged 12 and older, while the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson shots are authorized for use in people aged 18 and older.

The FDA is slated to meet Oct. 26 to evaluate the data on the kids’ vaccine from the drugmakers, which will then be followed by a review meeting with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Nov. 2.

In a news briefing on Wednesday, White House Coronavirus Response Coordinator Jeff Zients told reporters, according to CNBC, “We know millions of parents who’ve been waiting for the COVID-19 vaccine for kids in this age group and should the FDA and CDC authorize the vaccine, we will be ready to get shots in arms.”

The White House has devised a plan to get the COVID shot in kids' arms as quickly as possible, using a two-dose regime, with a smaller needle to administer the vaccine dose to the younger children.

The vaccine will be able to be stored for 10 weeks in normal refrigeration temperatures or for six months at much lower ultra-cold temperatures.

To separate the vaccine for children, Pfizer will change the formulation and dose, providing 10 doses per vial in cartons of 10 vials each. Doctors’ offices and community health groups will be provided with 100 doses per package, White House officials said.

Schools will also offer the vaccine, as well as vaccination sites across the U.S., which will be funded through FEMA. Transportation and medical supplies will be provided to community vaccination sites through the FEMA monies, according to the White House.

There will also be access to child vaccines at local health centers and rural clinics for the more than 3 million children who are served by community medical providers, Biden administration officials indicated.

“Kids have different needs than adults, and our operational planning is geared to meet those specific needs, including by offering vaccinations and settings that parents and kids are familiar with,” Zients said, as reported by CNBC.

A public campaign to educate parents and other caregivers about the vaccine and risks of COVID for children will be introduced by the Department of Health and Human Services.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, there were about 131,000 new child COVID cases over the past week, adding to the more than 1.1 million child cases over the past six weeks.

The United States began inoculating teens -- like 13-year-old Charles Muro in Connecticut -- with Pfizer-BioNTech's Covid-19 vaccine in May 2021, and Moderna is now the second firm to seek a US green light to administer its shot to adolescents The U.S. began inoculating teens -- like 13-year-old Charles Muro in Connecticut -- with Pfizer-BioNTech's Covid-19 vaccine in May 2021, and Moderna is now the second firm to seek a U.S. green light to administer its shot to adolescents. Photo: AFP / Joseph Prezioso