Drake is reportedly in deep negotiations to part ways with his collaboration with Nike's Jordan Brand to partner with Adidas instead, according to reports.

The 31-year-old rapper first "became inducted into the Team Jordan family" in December 2013, which he confirmed before an audience during a tour stop in Portland, Oregon. Since then, he has consistently worked with the brand to unveil new sneakers and apparel. His most recent release, being the Air Jordan 8 x OVO Sneaker, debuted Feb. 16 at $225 a pair. 

The Canadian artist even mentioned the Jordan Brand in his 2015 song "Jumpman," saying: "They gave me my own collection."

 

A post shared by champagnepapi (@champagnepapi) on

Drake, born Aubrey Graham, isn't fully satisfied with his current deal with Nike, however. According to Sole Collector, sources close to the rapper said he's seeking to forge a partnership that would allow him to have more creative and design freedom. Adidas' partnerships, however, reportedly offer these freedoms more than any other deal of its caliber.

If Drake drops Nike for Adidas, he would be able to join the likes of fellow artists Rihanna, Pharell Williams and Pusha T. 

In 2013, fellow rapper Kanye West famously exited Nike for Adidas in a reported $10 million deal.  West said his departure from Nike could be attributed to the company's failure to provide him with decent royalties on his highly sought-after Air Yeezy shoe. In doing so, he consequently called out Nike CEO Mark Parker for the deteriorated partnership.

"Mark Parker...I will still accept an investment in DONDA," West said during an interview with Shade 45, according to SPIN. "I've got some more ideas that don’t involve shoes [so] if you guys are investing in the arts...I am standing up and I'm telling you. I. Am. Warhol. I am the number one most impactful artist of our generation, in the flesh."

West continued, "I am Shakespeare, Walt Disney, Nike, Google. Now, who's gonna be the Medici Family and stand up and let me create more?"

Adidas and Nike did not immediately return International Business Times' request for comment.