Alabama’s Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore, who allegedly initiated a sexual encounter with a woman when she was just 14 years old, has since been accused by several other women of sexual misconduct.

However, reports suggest several women have now come forward in support of the former judge, saying they are not concerned if Moore sought dates with teenage girls in his early 30s, nearly four decades ago, when he was a county prosecutor. 

Dean Young, who ran for Congress last year and in 2013, is a regular at Moore rallies and press conferences and has been his ally since the early 1990s. She attended a press conference in Montgomery, capital of Alabama, Nov.16 to show Moore her support amid the string of allegations against him. Young was also joined by two other women during the conference. 

One of the supporters, 69-year-old Kay Day of Theodore, Alabama, spoke at the news conference and said the allegations against Moore do not bother her and won’t affect her support for him. Day also spoke about herself and said she began dating her husband when she was 18 and he was 32, Alabama's local news website AL.com reported.

"My mother married at 15 and married a man 14 years older than her. In that day, if you married someone that was 15 years older, it was common," she said. "Even if it were so, that would not make me not vote for Judge Moore. That is just not something that would make me discredit and ruin a man for the rest of his life."

Day clarified she has supported Moore for 20 years now and is devastated by the allegations against him.

“Gentleman. Never heard anything come out of his mouth that would even give me an inkling. Never crossed my mind. Perfect gentleman."

Another Moore supporter, who participated in the press conference, was 75-year-old Dee Owens who also refused to be bothered by the allegations.

"Not in the least because that's all right with me. When I was young I dated a gentleman that was 22 years older than me and my parents didn't have a problem with it. And mothers back then actually wanted their daughters to marry men that were older. They felt they would be taken care of," she said. 

Owens added her beliefs match with that of Moore’s and she is willing to back him up.

"I believe like he does. And like the Ten Commandments, he stood up. He will stand for what's right. Not like the RINOs we have in Washington. And definitely, I'll vote for him. And everybody I know, all my friends are voting for him," she said. 

Alabama Republican Party also offered their support for Moore, brushing aside worries of him losing the Senate race. The party’s chairwoman, Terry Lathan, did not directly speak about the allegations of sexual misconduct but clarified their party trusted voters to make the right decision.

“Judge Moore has vehemently denied the allegations made against him. He deserves to be presumed innocent of the accusations unless proven otherwise,” Lathan said in her statement, the New York Times reported.

Moore’s wife, Kayla Moore also shared a post on her Facebook page inviting everyone who has “the courage to stand by him and his family” to join her for “Women For Moore” press conference at the Alabama State Capitol on Nov. 17. 

Moore is scheduled to compete against Democrat Doug Jones on Dec. 12 in the special election for the seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions.