As the campaign to get people their booster shots begins, the U.S. is expected to approve a mix-and-match approach. This means whether a person received their initial COVID-19 jab from Johnson & Johnson, Moderna or Pfizer, they can get a booster through any of the three manufacturers. 

The Food and Drug Administration expects to announce the news soon but cannot publicly do so yet, according to a U.S. health official who spoke to the  Associated Press. The FDA guidance is expected to state that there is a preference of sticking with the same manufacturer, but if receiving a shot from one over the other is easier due to access, it is fine to do so.

This comes after last week's news that the FDA recommended Moderna and J&J COVID-19 booster shots for Americans who got their first dose. The U.S. authorized Pfizer booster shots last month for certain populations. Moderna and J&J are expected to be officially authorized this week. The New York Times reports that Moderna and J&J boosters will be approved Wednesday evening.

However, in the U.S. there is not yet a consensus on the combining of different shots.

The World Health Organization blasts the growing gap between the number of coronavirus vaccines administered in rich and poor countries, branding the inequity a global "moral outrage". The World Health Organization blasts the growing gap between the number of coronavirus vaccines administered in rich and poor countries, branding the inequity a global "moral outrage". Photo: WHO

There is still an ethical debate to be had about the necessity of booster shots instead of focusing on getting vaccines into the arms of others around the world. A lot of countries still cannot get a majority of their populations vaccinated. The World Health Organization called for a moratorium on boosters at least until the end of the year, according to CNBC. South America, North America, Europe, Asia and Oceania have all administered a single vaccine dose to 50% of their populations, but by comparison, only 7% of the population of Africa has received a dose.

WHO Chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus previously said, "It is unjust and also unfair because we will not stop the pandemic by ignoring a whole continent, and the continent that doesn't have any manufacturing capacity of other means."