With protesting and riots still breaking out around the United States in response to racial and social injustices, all eyes are moving to Cleveland, Ohio, as the city hosts the first Presidential debate between Joe Biden and President Donald Trump. However, with the tense race between the two coming center stage, there are also concerns in the city that unrest will once again take over in the streets.

According to WKYC, businesses have begun to board up their windows in Ward 6, the Fairfax neighborhood, which neighbors the Health Education Campus at Case Western Reserve and the Cleveland Clinic, where the debate will be held. They fear unrest breaking out depending on how things go at the event, something the area representative, Councilman Blaine Griffin revealed is a serious concern.

“Right now, we’re looking at one o the most polarized times that I have ever seen,” he said. “Because of that fear and because of that polarization, it’s paralyzing our community out of fear and it’s leading to anger and hate and suffering.”

The main concern is protests that could break out in the area, as recent experience in the area saw things go negative, something Griffin reiterated concerns about to Fox 8 News.

“From residents, the biggest concern I that nobody wants a repeat of May 30th,” he said. “Both sides claim that these are the kind of communities that they’re fighting for.”

The May 30th incident started as a peaceful protest demanding justice for George Floyd, just days after his death at the hands of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. After things started off at the Free Stamp on Lakeside Avenue and moved on to Public Square in a peaceful manner, rioting then broke out with crowds throwing objects at police officers, breaking windows and breaking into buildings and cars being set on fire near the Cuyahoga County Justice Center.

Business owners have boarded up their shops with panels that read "Justice for George," "Kids live here" or "Minority Owned," in an attempt to deter protesters Business owners have boarded up their shops with panels that read "Justice for George," "Kids live here" or "Minority Owned," in an attempt to deter protesters Photo: AFP / Kerem Yucel