Music producer DJ Khaled, whose social media posts sometimes feature alcohol brands, has garnered backlash from watchdog groups claiming the artist has been promoting brands without properly disclosing his ties to the company. 

DJ Khaled, whose real name is Khaled Mohamed Khaled, posted a video over the summer on his Snapchat account showing himself appearing to pour vodka over a bowl of cereal. 

This act was a promotion for alcohol, which was not advertised as such, according to Truth in Advertising, (TINA) a nonprofit consumer watchdog group focused on halting "false advertisement" and "deceptive marketing."

TINA, along with six other watchdog groups (Public Citizen, Alcohol Justice, U.S. Alcohol Policy Alliance, Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, the Center for Digital Democracy and Mothers Against Drunk Driving) surveyed DJ Khaled’s account from June 2017 to March 2018.

During the study, they found that over 200 of his posts on Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook and Twitter, featured some alcohol presence. 

Also that he had promoted alcohol brands Cîroc Vodka, Bumbu Rum, Belaire sparkling wine, and D’Ussé cognac over 300 times without labeling them as ads. His Snapchats regularly get over two million views before they disappear within 24 hours, TINA reported. 

TINA on March 29 issued a warning to the record producer that his failure to reveal his association with the alcohol brands during the ads violated Federal Trade Commission (FTC) laws.

According to TINA, 10 days after they issued message, DJ Khaled has not been seen posting alcohol on his social media accounts and has subsequently added the hashtag #AD to certain Instagram and Facebook posts.

Therefore, the group has yet to file a complaint with the FTC because DJ Khaled made changes to his posts to accurately inform viewers when he is promoting an ad.

"DJ Khaled has done the right thing by disclosing his material connections to these alcohol brands," TINA Executive Director Bonnie Patten told the Observer. "Time will tell if he is truly committed to ensuring that his followers are not misled by deceptive ads on his social media accounts. As for the alcohol companies, their failure to make certain that DJ Khaled complied with FTC law is absolutely inexcusable."

Although specific DJ Khaled posts have been labeled as ads, minors who follow his accounts are still being subjected to alcohol promotion, TINA said. 

"That DJ Khaled has used his special connection with young people to engage and motivate middle school and high school students as the national spokesperson for the nonprofit Get Schooled does not absolve him of the responsibility to keep alcohol ads away from minors," the organization wrote. 

"In fact, given DJ Khaled’s influence on the ‘young world’ and the well-documented dangers of underage drinking, it makes it all the more important."

DJ Khaled, 42, owns music recording label "We the Best" and is affiliated with "Roc Nation." He garnered national attention in October 2016 for livestreaming the birth of his son Asahd Tuck Khaled on social media.