Developer Epic Games has seen a big windfall since its release of the popular last-player-standing mode in “Fortnite” more than a year ago. Since then, “Fortnite” has grown to colossal proportions, generating large amounts of revenue across every modern gaming platform with a free-to-play business model.

According to new data from market research firm Sensor Tower, the iOS version alone has grossed $300 million worldwide.

Sensor Tower compared “Fortnite” to the revenue generated by other top “multiplayer mobile action games” in their first 200 days on the iOS App Store. According to that criteria, “Fortnite” made the most money in that time period, beating out the likes of “Clash Royale” and “Honor of Kings” with $300 million.

That averages out to players spending about $1.5 million per day on that version of “Fortnite” alone. That number jumped up to $2.5 million per day when the latest in-game “season” started in September. “Fortnite” introduces new seasons every couple of months, which incentivize players to spend money to gain access to new costumes and other cosmetic items in the game.

Still, somehow, “Fortnite” was not the fastest iOS game to reach $300 million in revenue. “Pokemon Go” accomplished that feat in 113 days when it launched in 2016, according to Sensor Tower.

Sensor Tower estimated the Android version of “Fortnite” has grossed $60 million since its August launch. That would be a significant haul considering that version has only been available for two months, and is still distributed as a beta that requires an invite from Epic. The iOS version also started as an invite-only test before going wide later.

“Fortnite” players can play the game as much as they want without paying for the service. However, cosmetic goods available for purchase in the game have proven popular, generating $1 billion on their own by July. The game has only become more popular as Epic has put it on more platforms. Players can carry their cosmetic purchases across most versions of the game.

The successes of the iOS and Android versions are not surprising. Data released earlier this year projected that mobile gaming would make up more than 50 percent of all gaming revenue by the end of 2018.