KEY POINTS

  • Ivanka Trump op-ed column for Miami Herald.
  • Ivanka Trump criticized by Twitter users.
  • Ivanka Trump as First Lady.

Ivanka Trump received backlash after her op-ed column praising the Trump economy.

The first daughter wrote an article for Miami Herald praising the Trump economy. According to Ivanka, the economy blew past expectations and added 266,000 jobs in November. She also took pride in the positive revisions of 41,000 additional jobs and the revival of the labor market under the administration of her father, President Donald Trump.

Ivanka shared the article on Twitter. “Income inequality is plummeting in the Trump Economy | Miami Herald,” she wrote in the caption.

However, many were not convinced of Ivanka’s post. Her tweet received mixed reactions from her supporters and critics, with some saying that it’s a lie, “fundamentally not true” and “illegitimate.” Others found Ivanka’s post “very funny” and “laughable.”

“Ministry of disinformation,” one commented.

“Not true!” another added.

A different user highlighted the writer of the article which read “Ivanka Trump and Tomas Philipson.” Another Twitter user said that Ivanka only wants a “name for herself.

“I love how you constantly self promote. It's really inspiring to see how much you think of yourself.” @MericanDaddy wrote.

Meanwhile, Lee Kanne said that contrary to Ivanka’s claim, the U.S. income inequality actually worsened and it has widened to a new gap.

Despite the criticisms, Ivanka’s supporters were very happy for what she accomplished. One thanked Ivanka for an awesome work. Another Twitter user wrote, “We love you, Ivanka.”

In related news, the POTUS took pride in his daughter’s accomplishments. Donald is convinced that Ivanka would be his heir. He even said that if Ivanka would run for president she will likely win because she is “very, very hard to beat.”

Ivanka Trump In this photo, Ivanka Trump attends an event where U.S. President Donald Trump spoke at the White House promoting the administration's efforts to decrease federal regulations Dec. 14, 2017, in Washington, D.C. Photo: Getty Images / Win McNamee