Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip were too late when they intervened and tried to save Princess Diana and Prince Charles’ marriage.

The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh tried their best to save the Prince and Princess of Wales’ troubled marriage. However, according to biographer Penny Junor in her 2015 book “The Firm,” the senior couples’ efforts were too late.

“Plenty had already been written about the state of the marriage; it was no secret that Charles and Diana were leading separate lives, seeing separate friends and that the marriage was in trouble,” Junor wrote.

In the summer of 1992, a meeting was called between Prince Philip, Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Charles and Princess Diana at Windsor. The meeting was to discuss the situation and see what they could do to salvage Prince Charles and Princess Diana’s union.

“This was the first time there had ever been a discussion of this kind,” Junor said.

“Calling a conference now was too late. Diana had gone public, and, intoxicated with the power she had over the husband who had cheated on her, she announced she wanted a trial separation.”

Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip were reportedly sympathetic, but they were against the idea of separation and urged the Prince and Princess of Wales to work on their marriage for the sake of their two boys, Prince William and Prince Harry, as well as the crown and country. They agreed to meet again the next day, however, Princess Diana didn’t show up.

Following Princess Diana and Prince Charles’ divorce, she did a photoshoot with internationally renowned photographer Mario Testino. In the photos, which are now considered iconic, the People’s Princess was like someone he has never seen before. She looked “sexy, carefee and happy.”

“It was a new period in her life, you could feel an energy between her joy or happiness,” Testino said. “I wanted to show her joy and excitement.”

According to Daniela Elser of News.com.au, the royal family wanted those Princess Diana photos to be buried. However, Prince William and Prince Harry treasured those shots because they reminded them that their mom “died right at the point she was finally achieving the most elusive of quarries, true happiness, after decades of heartbreak and rejection.”