Body language expert, Myka Meier, recently decoded Meghan Markle’s posture and movements during the Commonwealth Day service on Monday.

While speaking with The Huffington Post, Meier said that the recent gathering of the royal family already proved that Markle is very much a part of them. “Her posture showed confidence, her eye contact with the other royals means she’s on their level, and her newly polished look suggests she’s embracing both the British culture and the position,” she said.

Traci Brown, the author of “Persuasion Point: Body Language and Speech for Influence,” told the publication that Markle hit all the right marks during her recent outing with the royal family. Even though she had little to no interaction with Queen Elizabeth II, Markle appeared to be more relaxed than Princes William and Harry and even Kate Middleton.

Meier also compared Markle and Middleton and said that the Duchess of Cambridge has already gone through the transformation that Markle is currently undergoing. “Their relationship is not only one of soon-to-be-family, but also one of mentorship and friendship,” she said.

Meanwhile, Markle also made headlines after she was spotted singing the British national anthem “God Save the Queen.” Grant Harrold, another etiquette expert, said Markle did a wonderful job by singing Prince Harry’s national anthem. “After all, how many British people can sing ‘Star-Spangled Banner?’” he said.

Patti Wood, another body language expert, said that Markle seemed at ease when she met with fans after the Commonwealth Day Service.

“There was a wonderful moment when she was interacting with a little girl and she truly looks so relaxed and happy. I think that part of the role is something she’s very comfortable with. She was a little more nervous during the service, but she gets an A+ for so enthusiastically and effortlessly interacting with people,” she said.

Markle is expected to attend some other official engagements before her May 19 wedding to Prince Harry. The couple will tie the knot at St. George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle at 12 p.m. (7 a.m. EST). A carriage procession will follow at 1 p.m. (8 a.m. EST).