Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and other top Democrats are looking at August as a deadline to pass a $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure deal and another $6 trillion infrastructure deal via reconciliation, even if it means Senators have to work into the August recess to make it happen. CNBC reports.

Schumer announced his plans in a letter to his caucus ahead of the chamber’s return to Washington next week.

“My intention for this work period is for the Senate to consider both the bipartisan infrastructure resolution and a budget resolution with reconciliation instructions, which is the first step for passing legislation through the reconciliation process,” Schumer said.

“We have a lot of work to do. Senators should be prepared for the possibility of working long nights, weekends, and remaining in Washington into the previously scheduled August state work period,” he added.

The desired reconciliation bill contains funding for healthcare, childcare and combating climate change, and is an ambitious move with massive potential for helping Democratic lawmakers with their agenda. If it passes the Senate and the House, it could also help Democrats as midterm elections draw closer, helping them keep their slim majority in both houses of Congress.

However, there is a battle ahead, as the plan needs support from all 50 Democratic Senators, and Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., is still questioning the money being spent. The bill also needs to clear the Senate before heading to the House, where Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she will not let it go to a vote unless it passes the Senate first.

“I have said that I really cannot take up the reconciliation until we see the infrastructure and--cannot take up the infrastructure until we see the infrastructure reconciliation addressed by the Senate,” she said.

Eleven Republicans have endorsed the bipartisan plan, giving the bill enough votes in order to pass. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has not indicated his support for it yet.

According to the American Society of Civil Engineers, a minimum of $4.6 trillion will be required to update the country’s current infrastructure.

US Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer told reporters on February 10, 2021 that he hopes the "gut-wrenching" video footage from the January 6 attack on the US Capitol changes some of the senator-jurors' minds during Donald Trump's impeachment trial US Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer told reporters on February 10, 2021 that he hopes the "gut-wrenching" video footage from the January 6 attack on the US Capitol changes some of the senator-jurors' minds during Donald Trump's impeachment trial Photo: POOL / BRANDON BELL