KEY POINTS

  • Court documents indicate that the men organizing a foiled plot to kidnap Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer also had contingencies of mass political violence
  • They planned to forcibly take over the Michigan statehouse and televise the executions of public officials for a full week, or simply burn down the statehouse and everyone inside if that proved impossible
  • Several of the 14 men had their bail reduced and are now free. The fourteenth is awaiting extradition in Wisconsin

The right-wing militiamen behind the failed plot to kidnap and execute Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer had a "Plan B," according to newly filed court documents. They included a week of televised political executions at the statehouse.

According to reports Thursday, prosecutors alleged the 14 men were planning to take 200 armed men to the statehouse and spend seven days killing public officials on live television. 

There was also a "Plan C" domestic terror plot, in which they simply burn down the statehouse leaving no survivors.

In an interview last week with WSL, Chicago's ABC affiliate, Michigan attorney general Dana Nessel said that some of the suspects planning the killings attended a widely publicized armed protest inside Michigan’s statehouse.

"We are one of the few states that do not ban guns in our state capitol building,” Nessel said. “You probably saw the pictures back from in April, where we had armed gunmen, some of them the same defendants in this case, hovering over state senators with long guns, screaming and yelling at them as they were deliberating.”

Michael Null (L), one of those arrested in the plot to kidnap Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer, at an April 2020 rally against Covid-19 restrictions Michael Null (L), one of those arrested in the plot to kidnap Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer, at an April 2020 rally against Covid-19 restrictions Photo: AFP / JEFF KOWALSKY

The original charges only detailed their primary plan to kidnap Whitmer, hold her in a concealed basement and then take her into the woods for a “trial.”

Several of the men have had their bond reduced and are now walking free. The fourteenth member of the band is still in Wisconsin awaiting extradition, although his lawyer has signaled he might challenge the process.

Concerns over safety and right-wing militias extend beyond Michigan’s borders. Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker said that his office often receives threats.

“We have threats that stream into my office daily, while we have watched the kidnapping plot against the Michigan governor unfold just a state away,” Pritzker said Thursday.