Did a Russian astronaut confirm a UFO sighting during a recorded conversation with ground control staff from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)? According to a fringe website following unusual, possible extraterrestrial phenomenon, this was quite a convincing possibility. 

ET Database released a report of what it says sounds like an astronaut pointing out a ship during one of the regular check-ins between ground control and the International Space Station (ISS). The conversation, which sounded like ground control staff from NASA checking in on a report from the ISS, heard the Russian make the mention of “a ship” just as two unusual blips showed up on the live feed from the space station’s live camera feed. 

Report author Scott Waring finds it hard to believe that this was anything less than an affirmation of the possibility of an alien sighting from the deck of the ISS. 

In a video, Waring outlines the important bits of the recording. Waring says that at around two minutes into the video, the astronaut says “...a ship...” just as the blips showed up on the video. The ground control crewman then responds with “Copy all. We just clarified. It’s with you...thank you.” 

Perhaps even more amazing than the possibility of aliens, however, is Waring’s additional assertion that it sounded like NASA was already aware of the existence of this and similar phenomena–and cutting off the further mention of the same in a recorded conversation. 

Could the astronaut have been referring to the two blips as ‘ships’, as Waring suggests? At first glance, the blips on the video could be explained by a trick of the light, or perhaps even light reflecting off a surface–perhaps even off the surface of the earth which was at night at the time, as the ISS moved over that region of the planet.

And while it did sound like the operator from NASA was cutting off the astronaut in order to keep him from going further, that might not have been the whole story. It’s quite possible that the operator’s message suffered from the three to six-second delay that happens during conversations between the ISS and mission control.

It looks like you need to keep your eyes on the skies, Scott.