Donald Trump's former chief of staff Mark Meadows had previously refused to testify to the Jan. 6 committee or hand over any materials. In a reversal on Tuesday, Meadows and the Jan. 6 investigators reached an agreement.

According to CNN, the two parties struck a deal over how Meadows would reveal information to the committee and what information he would provide. Certain materials will fall under executive privilege, though what applies under executive privilege remains unclear.

The decision by Meadows comes after had been repeatedly warned by lawmakers that he could face a criminal contempt referral if he does not cooperate. Trump strategist Steve Bannon’s arrest and his criminal case confirmed that the House committee is intent on getting answers. Bannon, who was indicted on Nov. 12, had ignored a subpoena issued on Sept. 23.

“We continue to work with the Select Committee and its staff to see if we can reach an accommodation that does not require Mr. Meadows to waive Executive Privilege or to forfeit the long-standing position that senior White House aides cannot be compelled to testify before Congress," Meadows' attorney George Terwilliger said in a statement. "We appreciate the Select Committee's openness to receiving voluntary responses on non-privileged topics."

Bannon, Roger Stone, Alex Jones, Michael Flynn, Kayleigh McEnany, and Stephen Miller are among the 45 people and organizations including the Proud Boys and Stop the Steal that the committee has subpoenaed to testify.

Supporters of US President Donald Trump objecting to Joe Biden's victory, storm the stairs of the US Capitol in Washington, DC. Supporters of US President Donald Trump objecting to Joe Biden's victory, storm the stairs of the US Capitol in Washington, DC. Photo: AFPTV / Michael BRIFFAUD

Meadows’ decision is a marked change from the status quo of Trump allies refusing to testify about what happened on Jan. 6, to what extent was there any planning involving an insurrection, and if so, who planned it.

The committee heard from 200 witnesses before issuing the subpoenas. Reporting has already revealed that Republican congressmen, senators, and White House staff could have had a direct role in planning and facilitating the means for the Jan. 6 riots to occur.