KEY POINTS

  • Some people who received the COVID-19 vaccine said they experienced "metal mouth"
  • Others said they've had vivid dreams of space
  • Coronavirus vaccines may also cause the "COVID arm"

Some people who received the COVID-19 vaccine have experienced some weird side effects, including “metal mouth” and dreams of space, a CBS4 medical editor said Monday.

During his weekly question-and-answer session on CBSN Denver, Dr. Dave Hnida said health officials across the country are learning about a pattern of strange side effects being reported as more Americans get vaccinated. 

The reactions include “metal mouth” or “nickel mouth,” in which vaccine recipients develop a strange metallic taste in their mouths. 

“People, literally within a couple of minutes of getting their vaccine to a day or so after, just taste like they’ve got a lot of coins in their mouths, a really metallic taste,” Hnida explained. 

The doctor also said that some people experienced vivid dreams, with the most common theme being space. These include dreams inspired by “Back to the Future” with hovercrafts and hover cars.

“Flying to the moon, planting the flag on the moon. Even somebody going out and taking Abraham Lincoln to get a Big Mac and having the staff want him to autograph the bills. We really think it has something to do with the immune response. They are temporary,” Hnida explained. 

In early January, health officials reported that some people experienced the “Moderna arm,” which could also be called the “COVID arm.” It was first seen in people who got Moderna’s vaccine. The condition, which has also affected those who received other coronavirus vaccines, shows up as a red rash that can be itchy. 

Doctors say the rash doesn't appear to be dangerous. They also indicated that COVID arm is a topical and brief response of the body’s immune system to the vaccine. The rash typically lasts 24 hours to a week.

“We want to reassure people that this is a known phenomenon," Dr. Esther Freeman, director of global health dermatology at Massachusetts General Hospital, told USA Today. "Having a big red splotch on your arm for a couple of days may not be fun but the reality is there's no need to panic and no reason not to get your second shot."

Europe's latest wave of infections came after outbreaks were largely brought under control and as nations prepared for mass vaccine rollouts Europe's latest wave of infections came after outbreaks were largely brought under control and as nations prepared for mass vaccine rollouts Photo: AFP / Cole Burston