KEY POINTS

  • President Biden and Vice President Harris called George Floyd's family after Derek Chauvin's conviction
  • Biden suggested plans to address systemic racism
  • The vice president urged Congress to pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act

President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris on Tuesday called George Floyd’s family to express their support and sympathy after a jury found Derek Chauvin guilty of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

Ben Crump, the attorney for the Floyd family, took to Twitter to share a video of Floyd’s family on a call with Biden and Harris following the verdict

“We are all so relieved,” Biden said. “We’re going to get a lot of work done. We’re going to do a lot. This is going to be our first shot at dealing with, genuinely, systemic racism.”

The president also revealed that he had been watching the verdict from the White House along with Harris and senior adviser Cedric Richmond. 

“I’m just so grateful for the entire family. You have courage, you have strength. This is a day of justice in America,” Harris said.  

“History will look back and know that this is an inflection moment. In George’s name and memory, we are going to make sure his legacy is intact. We really do believe that with your leadership, and the president that we have in the White House, that we’re going to make something good come out of this tragedy,” she continued.

Following the verdict, Biden and Harris in remarks called the conviction of Chauvin for his role in Floyd’s death a step forward. The vice president also suggested a plan to “reform” the system.

"A measure of justice isn't the same as equal justice," Harris said. "This verdict brings us a step closer and the fact is, we still have work to do. We still must reform the system."

The vice president also urged Congress to pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, a measure that would prohibit racial profiling at every level of law enforcement and ban choke holds, carotid holds and no-knock warrants. 

It also would allow the government to institute a national police misconduct registry and overhaul qualified immunity given to law enforcement. 

The legislation was passed in the House in March but faces a challenge gaining 60 votes in the Senate where Republicans have expressed their opposition. 

US President Joe Biden gestures as he delivers remarks on the guilty verdict against former policeman Derek Chauvin at the White House in Washington, DC US President Joe Biden gestures as he delivers remarks on the guilty verdict against former policeman Derek Chauvin at the White House in Washington, DC Photo: AFP / Brendan SMIALOWSKI