Whether viewers of President-elect Donald Trump’s swearing-in are watching from the National Mall, the Pennsylvania Avenue roadside or their living rooms, there will be much to follow. Read on for a full schedule of the historic ceremony for the formal ascension to office of America’s first president with no public sector experience.

Thursday, Jan. 19

3:30 PM to 4 p.m. – Wreath Laying Ceremony

On Thursday afternoon, Trump and Vice President-elect Mike Pence will kick off the festivities by laying a wreath at  Arlington National Cemetery, a way of honoring U.S. veterans. The  624-acre military cemetery sits across the Potomac River from the Capitol, and is the resting place of  more than 400,000 people.

4 p.m. to 6 p.m. – “Make America Great Again! Welcome Celebration”

At this event, Trump will make his first speech of the three days of festivities, Presidential Inauguration Committee (PIC) spokesman Alex Stroman  told local broadcaster NBC4, before handing off the Lincoln Memorial stage to a litany of groups dubbed “Voices of the People” performers. They include three bagpipe groups, three local high school marching bands, the Republican Hindu Coalition, a Boy Scouts troop, a middle school choir, two baton and flag twirling groups and an  award-winning religious singer, according to the PIC’s website.  

The committee said the concert will also feature performances from country singer Toby Keith — whose  song about lynching spurred controversy upon its 2008 release — 78-year-old actor and  longtime Trump supporter Jon Voight, “God Bless the U.S.A.” singer Lee Greenwood, the DJ known as RaviDrums, The Piano Guys, 3 Doors Down and The Frontmen of the Country, according to the PIC. Broadway singer Jennifer Holliday was previously scheduled to perform at this event, but apologized to the LGBT community in a note to The Wrap that she “had a lapse of judgment” and “WILL NOT PERFORM FOR THE WELCOME CONCERT OR FOR ANY OF THE INAUGURATION FESTIVITIES!”

Friday, Jan. 20

Unknown – Morning Worship (and coffee)

Like all the incoming presidents before him  since Franklin Roosevelt was sworn in nearly a century ago, Trump will head to a church service before the ceremony kicks off. The president-elect will likely attend  St. John’s Episcopal Church on H Street for the morning worship, NBC4  reported. But, according to the local news station, he’ll first have another tradition to uphold: having coffee with the outgoing president at the White House.

11:30 a.m. to 12:30 a.m. – Swearing-In Ceremony

Following a  procession to the Capitol with President Obama from the morning worship service, Trump will arrive at the weekend’s main event, where he and Pence will be sworn in to office alongside their families and members of the Supreme Court, the House, the Senate, diplomats from the world over and “other distinguished invited guests,” according to the PIC site. Bill and Hillary Clinton, along with George W. and Laura Bush,  will also be in attendance.  

Tickets to the main event, as well as the welcome ceremony, are free and color-coded based on the sitting or standing zone. In the first couple of weeks in January, the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies issued hundreds of thousands of tickets, mostly to members of Congress, who are considered the hosts of the event. Those interested in getting a seat for the ceremony or welcome celebration should contact their local Senators or House representatives, and while many tickets normally go to the Congress members themselves ahead of each inauguration, quite a few are skipping the event this year, freeing up a few extra passes.

Those attending the event can get to the National Mall up to five and a half hours beforehand, as security screenings  begin at 6 a.m., according to NBC4. Music will begin two hours before the first remarks are made, and “America’s Got Talent” star Jackie Evancho  will get the ceremony started with the National Anthem — a move that has recently led the 16-year-old, who has a transgender sister, to face some  harsh criticism online.

The Mormon Tabernacle Choir, which will also perform, was not immune to backlash either. One member resigned over the group’s decision to perform at the inauguration.

The Radio City Rockettes will put on a show, amid a flurry of controversy in which  false reports alleging the dancers were forced to appear at the ceremony surfaced near the end of December.

The musical and dance numbers will be followed by words from a Catholic cardinal, a rabbi and both black and Hispanic Protestant clergy members, the Washington Post  reported.

Pence then Trump, will be sworn in  on the west front of the Capitol, with the latter repeating the  oath of office: “I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.”

Trump will then read his inaugural address, of which the longest in history, coming at  8,445 words, was delivered by William Henry Harrison in March 1841. Harrison died of pneumonia one month later. George Washington delivered the shortest one, with just 135 words, in April 1789.

Barack and Michelle Obama will then  make their official departure from the White House, and the Trumps and Pences will continue a tradition going back more than a century — the inaugural luncheon, hosted by the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies in the Statuary Hall of the Capitol Building, an expansive rotunda filled with  100 statues and busts, with two coming from each state.  

3 p.m. to 5 p.m. – Inaugural Parade

Unlike in past presidential inaugurations,  no university or high school marching bands in the Washington, D.C. area will join the parade, but there will be  more than 8,000 participants making their way down Pennsylvania Avenue to the White House along with the new president, according to the PIC. The high school and college bands, police drill teams, bagpipers, Boy Scots, veterans’ groups, equestrian teams and drill squads hail from  21 states. Each branch of the U.S. military will also have representatives present.

Starting at the northeast end of the Capitol, Trump and the parade’s participants will head down Constitution Avenue before veering slightly right on Pennsylvania Avenue, past the Newseum, the National Archives Building, the Federal Bureau of Investigation headquarters and a building the president-elect knows well, the Trump International Hotel in the Old Post Office building.  

7 p.m. to 11 p.m. – Inaugural Ball

Ever since Dolley Madison hosted a gala at Long’s Hotel on Capitol Hill in 1809, with $4 tickets sold to 400 guests, the Inaugural Ball has become a lasting tradition. Tickets to the three official inaugural balls — two at the Washington Convention Center, where Obama held his in 2013, and one at the National Building Museum specifically for the armed services — are either by invitation only or require an application. But don’t expect to get into the galas less than a week in advance.

But inauguration attendees willing to shell out a few hundred bucks on a ticket to one of the many unofficial balls, plus the necessary black-tie attire, can check out travel site About Travel’s list of unofficial and semiofficial formal events nearby from Jan. 17 to Jan. 21, the tickets for which span from $75 to $1,250 a pop.

Saturday, Jan. 21

10 a.m. to 11 a.m. – National Prayer Service

Late-night ball goers won’t get to sleep in too late Saturday, as many, including the Trumps and Pences, will be attending an interfaith service at the Washington National Cathedral Saturday morning. This event, which is by invitation only, will allow Trump “to pause and contemplate the incredible responsibility he has been entrusted with and to listen as the faith community offers prayers for the office of the president,” according to a statement from the cathedral.