A year after a filmmaker admitted that he faked the infamous “Roswell Alien Autopsy” video, a leaked memo revealed that a scientist from the CIA confirmed that the contents of the footage were actually real. The scientist noted that the alien cadaver featured in the video was authentic.

The original alien autopsy video was obtained by British businessman Ray Santilli in 1992. He got it from a retired U.S. military cameraman while looking for archive footages of Elvis Presley. Shortly after, Santilli sold the clip to various TV stations, which then sparked a public frenzy regarding the existence of aliens.

Although the footage has been regarded by UFO enthusiasts as the definitive proof of extraterrestrial beings, its authenticity was debunked in 2018 after filmmaker Spyros Melaris came forward to confess that he directed and produced the video.

According to Melaris, the footage was shot at a house in North London. He admitted that he used animal organs and a foam sculpture of an alien for the cadaver.

Even though the video was already debunked, new information suggested that it was actually real according to a leaked memo sent by physicist Eric Davis of the National Institute for Discovery Science to the organization’s founder Robert Bigelow.

According to The Sun, which was able to obtain photos of the memo, the document was leaked via email to British UFO investigator Philip Mantle. It was believed to have originated from the archives of former NASA astronaut and ufologist Edgar Mitchell.

The memo, which was sent on March 23, 2001, focused on the professional evaluation of the “Roswell Alien Autopsy” video by a CIA scientist known as Kit Green.

In the document, Green confirmed that the cadaver featured in the video was real and it was the same one that was shown in the photos revealed during his briefings with Pentagon from 1987 to 1988. He also hinted where the samples allegedly taken from the cadaver may have been stored.

“Kit said that the alien forensic tissues could hypothetically be located at Walter Reed – Armed Forces Institute for Pathology (WR-AFIP) Medical Museum, which is not open to the public and requires a security clearance to get in,” Davis stated in the memo.

Melaris has not yet released a statement addressing the contents of the memo and how the document relates to his short film.