Unemployment

Unemployment occurs when a person is available and willing to work but currently without work. The prevalence of unemployment is usually measured using the unemployment rate, which is defined as the percentage of those in the labor force who are unemployed. The unemployment rate is also used in economic studies and economic indices such as the United States' Conference Board's Index of Leading Indicators as a measure of the state of macroeconomics.

Keynesian economics emphasizes unemployment resulting from insufficient effective demand for goods and services in the economy (cyclical unemployment). Others point to structural problems and inefficiencies inherent in labour markets; structural unemployment involves mismatches between demand and supply of laborers with the necessary skillset, sometimes induced by disruptive technologies or globalisation. Classical or neoclassical economics tends to reject these explanations, and focuses more on rigidities imposed on the labor market from the outside, such as unionization, minimum wage laws, taxes, and other regulations that may discourage the hiring of workers (classical unemployment). Yet others see unemployment as largely due to voluntary choices by the unemployed and the time it takes to find a new job (frictional unemployment). Behavioral economics highlights phenomena such as sticky wages and efficiency wages which may lead to unemployment.

There is also disagreement on how exactly to measure unemployment. Different countries experience different levels of unemployment; traditionally, the United States experiences lower unemployment levels than countries in the European Union, although there is variant there, with countries like the UK and Denmark outperforming Italy and France and it also changes over time (e.g. the Great Depression) throughout economic cycles.

Occupy Wall Street - Passé Or Canary In A Coal Mine?

The Occupy Wall Street protest movement is expected to resume Monday, on the 1-year anniversary of the protests. Is the coalition passé and irrelevant? Or is it a canary in a coalmine - an indicator of worsening economic and social problems in the United States?

There Is No Debate, Obama Saved Ohio

Clearly, there is no debate. Based on the facts, it’s Obama who deserves all of the credit. His actions and policies saved the great State of Ohio from economic calamity.

South African Activist Elder Epainette Mbeki Scolds ANC

Epainette Mbeki, mother of former South African President Thabo Mbeki and revered anti-Apartheid activist, recently criticized the country's ruling African National Congress which had pressured her son to resign in 2007. The ANC continues to have wide support in South Africa, but Mbeki stressed that its leaders needed to communicate better with the people or public unrest would increase amid the country's persistent economic disparities.

US Economy To Grow 2% Or Less This Year: Fed

The U.S. central bank lowered its forecast for economic growth this year, but it reiterated its expectations for unemployment. Further, the bank said it now expects the Fed's first interest rate hike to take place in 2015.

Yemen: Anti-Islam Film Is The Least Of This Poverty-Stricken Nation's Many Problems

Anger in the Muslim and Arab world over an anti-Islam film produced in America has spread to Yemen, where several hundred protesters stormed the U.S. Embassy in the capital, Sana. Yemen is already dealing with widespread social problems due to food and water shortages, rising extremism and sectarian conflict and political instability following the popular uprising that began in 2011.

US Federal Reserve Sept. 13 Meeting Statement [Full Text]

In the statement, the Federal Reserve announced Thursday it will buy $40 billion per month of mortgage-backed securities, the start of the so-called third round of quantitative easing, QE3. The Fed also said it will continue 'Operation Twist,' bringing total securities purchased per month to $85 billion.

Corsica: Violence In Paradise

The island, officially French but in fact very much its own place, is among the most beautiful in the Mediterranean, but it still suffers from endemic violence by nationalists and mobsters. What's wrong with Corsica, then?

US Stock Futures Signal Lower Open Ahead Of Fed Decision

The U.S. stock index futures point to a lower open Thursday as investors maintained a cautious mode ahead of the Federal Reserve meeting in which there is the likelihood of another round of quantitative easing measures to be announced to invigorate the economy.

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